Home-Made A Textile Art Show Gallery Opening

Textile Art Gallery showpieces

-By Lissette De la Cruz

A collection of textile art from some of the Scott County Public Library Friends and StaffTextile Art Gallery

In December, the Scott County Public Library is sharing its featured art exhibit, Home Made: A Textile Art Show at the library’s Art Gallery. Friends of the Scott County Public Library President, Mary Fogos, long-time members Sharon Bedwell and June Helligrath, and SCPL’s Adult Services Manager, Melissa Gibson debuted their spectacular collections on December 4. The gallery will be showcasing a variety of their hand work with cross-stitching and needlepoint techniques. The Scott County Public Library invites community members to visit this exhibit for the month of December and January to discover beautiful creations made with careful attention and delicate details!

Scott County Public Library celebrated National Native American Heritage Month!

-By Lissette De la Cruz

November was National Native American Heritage Month. It provided the perfect opportunity to celebrate the culture, history, and accomplishments of Native Americans.

photos for National Native American Heritage MonthThe Scott County Public Library had the great pleasure of presenting a Native American Flute Concert performed by Fred Nez-Keams. Patrons spent a peaceful evening listening to the sounds of the Native American flute paired with other instruments. Fred is a member of the Navaho nation. He brought a piece of his history and culture alive by sharing his beautiful music with us.

 

You can hear Fred Nez-Keams again on January 12th during one of our regular Sunday Sounds programs. Sunday Sounds is a musical tradition here at the library, where you can listen to local musicians in the Next Chapter Café every Sunday from 2-3 pm. These programs are perfect for the whole family to enjoy and we hope to see you there.

 

Collage photos for National Native American Heritage Month

The Scott County Public Library invites everyone to continue to learn more about the many traditions Native Americans celebrate in their lives. You can learn more by exploring our large collection of books on the subject.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References:

http://www.ncai.org

https://nativeamericanheritagemonth.gov

El Día de los Muertos: A Celebration of Life and Death

Day of the dead
Stock image via pixels.com

-By Lissette De la Cruz

The Day of the Dead is not spooky, somber, nor is it a Mexican version of Halloween. While the days are close together, it is a day that originated within Mexico and is widely celebrated throughout Latin America. El Día de los Muertos or “Day of the Dead” is recognized Thursday, October 31 through Saturday, November 2. Those who honor this tradition, believe that past souls visit from the heavens to spend time with their families. On November 1, El Día de los Angelitos or Day of the Little Angels, are first to visit, and on November 2, El Día de los Difuntos, adults join the celebration.

During El Día de los Muertos, families create an ofrenda, or an offering in the form of an altar to honor their deceased relatives. Offerings are usually a colorful display of personalized items such as photographs, foods, baked pastries, and candles. Made to welcome those who have been lost, families celebrate this tradition by spending time together with food, music, and partaking in activities their loved ones enjoyed when they were living. The result is an unforgettable celebration filled with bright, colorful and exciting festivities!

“One time a year, our departed come back to celebrate with us.”

There is a strong importance in food offerings to honor the lives of those who have passed. Some significant items included in private family altars are salt to purify the spirits of traveling loved ones and water to quench the thirst of the deceased after their long travels to reunite with their families. Some other popular dishes to enjoy during the holiday are Mole, Pan de Muertos or Bread of the Dead, soups, and tamales. As well as the favorite dishes of those who have passed. Although, they are known to only indulge in the aromas of the offered food.

Along with food, other symbolic offerings are Marigolds, the commonly used flower known to represent evanescent life. This beautiful flower is known to guide loved ones back to their families. Another customary offering are candles, which are lit for each deceased relative as the candles light the path back to their families. Many families visit graveyards during this time to clean tombstones and leave flowers and candles to welcome the deceased back to the world of the living.

Day of the dead
Participants standing in front of an altar during Día de los Muertos
Windzepher/iStock via Getty Images

“Our dead are never dead to us, until we have forgotten them.”

As for the skulls that are predominately seen during El Día de los Muertos, they are known to give a good-humored nod to the idea of death. This time of the year, families choose to celebrate death as a beautiful thing instead of something to fear. They welcome back their loved ones with open arms for the chance to reminisce on times well spent and remind themselves how very much alive they remain in their hearts.

Day of the dead

The Scott County Public Library invites the Scott County community to celebrate Día de los Muertos with us! Patrons are welcome to bring photos of their loved ones and to help create Día de los Muertos inspired crafts for our library altar displayed behind our Information Desk.

 

References:

https://dayofthedead.holiday/

https://www.inside-mexico.com/the-day-of-the-dead-ofrenda-2/

3…2…1…BLAST OFF! 
Scott County Public Library Launches Global Rocket Event!

Global Rocket Launch at SCPL

-By Lissette De la Cruz

On July 16, 1969, the Apollo 11 mission set off to outer space, and became the first to successfully land on the moon. Four days later, an estimated 650 million people watched on television as Commander Neil Armstrong took his first steps on the moon, and heard his unforgettable words, “that’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”

On July 16, 2019, to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo rocket launch to the moon, Scott County Public Library held a NASA/Global Rocket Launch event. We joined together with Huntsville “Rocket City”, Alabama and their Space Camp for the chance to enter the world record books with the most rockets shot into the air on one day.

Scott County Public Library invited the community to join this worldwide celebration of mankind’s monumental achievement. As the world came together, children and adults from Scott County participated in making their very own straw rockets! Fun craft materials were provided, and imaginations soared as participants buzzed with excitement in anticipation to blast off their rockets!

Jill Szwed and the LEX18 team joined this event as they filmed their final installment of their Summer Reading Program of libraries in central Kentucky. Szwed kicked off the rocket launch with family story time, reading a book with a solar system theme. Soon everyone gathered round for countdown as children prepared to blast off their rockets!

Global Rocket Launch at SCPL

The Scott County Public Library’s Summer Reading feature is scheduled to air on Wednesday (7/24) at 5:30 pm on LEX18!
We were delighted to have many participants, and to have been awarded a Certificate of Participation from the U.S. Space & Rocket Center. Thanks to everyone who attended and participated in this historical event!

Global Rocket Launch at SCPL  Global Rocket Launch at SCPL

Use hashtag #GlobalRocketLaunch to see all the excitement shared from around the world!

More Than Books – How Libraries Inspire Connections

More Than Books – How Libraries Inspire Connections

Adams Memorial- By Sharon Roggenkamp

A new program on Cemetery Symbolism, set for Monday, October 8 at 6:30 p.m. features Johnna Waldon from Lexington Public Library. Walden, the president of the Kentucky Genealogy Society, considers genealogy a professional specialty and personal hobby. Listening to stories passed along to her by her grandmother, today she studies headstones and their inscriptions. Whether they appear on “big grand monuments or the small simple field stones” said Waldon, they reveal social, economic and historical context.

Two historical footnotes confirm they also inspire moments of shared experience in that setting, and the lives of writer Henry Adams and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt intersected at a famous gravesite in Rock Creek Cemetery in Maryland.

Called the “Adams Memorial”, it was sculpted by Augustus Gaudens (1848-1907), in 1891. Gaudens is most famous for his bronze monument depicting Union Lieutenant Robert Gould Shaw, a privileged son of white, wealthy abolitionists, and the soldiers of the unit he led, one of the first African American regiments in the Civil War, who died together in battle.

Henry Adams commissioned him to create a monument to his wife, Marian, said to be the inspiration for his novels, Daisy Miller and The Portrait of a Lady. A lively, vivacious and popular hostess and photographer, she committed suicide in 1885, after battling depression following the death of her father.

The monument is a stark, powerfully moving life-size statue of a woman shrouded in the graceful folds of a dark black granite cloak, her eyes closed. Soon it attracted ordinary visitors and prominent Americans, including Mark Twain.

In 1918, Eleanor Roosevelt discovered a packet of love letters exchanged by her husband Franklin and her social secretary, Lucy Mercer. Devastated, she offered him his freedom, but a bargain was struck between them, at the urging of his mother, Sara, and for the sake of their children. Deeply troubled and grieving, Eleanor drove herself out to the cemetery to visit the Adams memorial, and reflect on its meaning. It is not surprising she later explained she found it comforting because it depicted someone who "transcended pain and hurt to achieve serenity."

A library program begins as a simple entry on a calendar, followed by a phone call, e-mail or conversation with the person who will present the program. Yet the unique thing about a library, is how these conversations branch off in new directions, as in the story of the “mysterious memorial” to Marian Adams.   Best of all, as Ms. Waldon shares her knowledge and experience, the visitors who give up their time to listen and participate will share theirs, just one more example of the way libraries enrich communities.

10 Most Influential Books

10-influential-books

-By Melissa Gibson

What are the ten most influential books you have ever read? These would be the books that have touched your life in some way; awakened an interest, formed ideas or established a lifelong love. If you are a long-time reader it may be difficult to limit your list to only ten and your list may change with your moods.  Here is my list of books I met before my sophomore year in high school which I loved dearly, thought about deeply or which changed the way I viewed my world.

1. Hitty, Her First Hundred Years by Rachel Field. The first “big” book I read by myself, this enchanting novel is a doll’s memoirs and is by turns haunting, hilarious and thought-provoking.

2. The Black Stallion series by Walter Farley. OK, I cheated a bit here. I was a horse-freak as a girl (still am) and I simply couldn’t get enough of these books. We read the first one, The Black Stallion as a family when I was in the second grade and then I was off and running, devouring the rest by myself.

3. The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett. I was so immersed in Burnett’s garden I couldn’t tear myself away and so finished this book by flashlight under the covers. Shhhh.

4. Winnie the Pooh by A. A. Milne. Pooh was my first introduction to refined, understated literary humor. My sister and I read this aloud (with all the voices) to truly experience the magic of The Hundred Acre Woods.

5. My Friend Flicka by Mary O’Hara. Horses, again. But O’Hara’s world was vastly different from the less nuanced work of Farley with her beautiful, delicate descriptions that immerses the reader completely in her world.

6. Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell. This was another after-dark-under-the-covers read for me. I had a deal with my mother – I could read what I wanted (in this case Mitchell’s iconic work) if I read The Deerslayer first. I read Fenimore’s plodding classic in the daylight hours so all could see what an obedient daughter I was but read all of Gone by flashlight at night under the covers.

7. Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee Brown. This is my epiphany book, the one after which I never saw the world, my nation and its history quite the same again.

8. Andersonville by MacKinlay Kantor. Kantor’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of the Confederate POW camp in Georgia has become the standard by which I have since judged every work of historical fiction ever since I read it one summer, baking in a lawn chair in my backyard, horror-struck and mesmerized by Kantor’s prose.

9. The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens. Mr. Pickwick and his misadventures introduced me to the classics in an entirely new way and I fell in love with Dickens and English literature as a result.

10. The Gulag Archipelago by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. Curiosity led me to read this expose of the Russian prison system written by one of the Soviet’s most famous defectors but through it I discovered a fascination with Russian literature that has never entirely left me.

This is my list. What’s on yours?